Quote of the Day:

Barton Gellman

  • Everyone and his Big Brother wants to log your browsing habits, the better to build a profile of who you are and how you live your life - online and off. Search engine companies offer a benefit in return: more relevant search results. The more they know about you, the better they can tailor information to your needs.
  • Experts said public companies worry about the loss of customer confidence and the legal liability to shareholders or security vendors when they report flaws.
  • A minimum precaution: keep your anti-malware protections up to date, and install security updates for all your software as soon as they arrive.
  • The first reports of AIDS closely followed the inauguration of President Ronald Reagan, whose 'family values' agenda and alliance with Christian conservatives associated AIDS with deviance and sin.
  • China and Russia are regarded as the most formidable cyber threats.
  • We know what's in our Cheerios and in our retirement accounts because the law requires disclosure.
  • Activists and geeks, standing together, are demonstrating powers beyond the reach of government control.
  • Privacy and encryption work, but it's too easy to make a mistake that exposes you.
  • Privacy is relational. It depends on the audience. You don't want your employer to know you're job hunting. You don't spill all about your love life to your mom or your kids. You don't tell trade secrets to your rivals.
  • One common puzzle for the security-minded is how to work with confidential data on the road. Sometimes you can't bring your laptop, or don't want to. But working on somebody else's machine exposes you to malware and leaves behind all kinds of electronic trails.